Tag Archives: history

A Walk on the Wild Side

I took a walk across the fields tonight.  In the golden hour, although I was a little late getting out so missed it slightly.  Happiness is when walking across the fields.  The quiet, the closeness to nature, the evening light.  The corn is ready to be harvested and there is a mellowness in the air, the feeling that summer is over and now is the time for the earth to rest and contemplate.

corn bouquet

path two

white flowers

Its not often I like photographs taken of me but I had to include this self portrait.  This is me at my happiest, at one with nature.

girl on a straw bale

Along the Cinder Path

Every week we went on picnics in the summertime.  Kids around would come and say, “Are you going to the picnic?”  “Yes.”  And you either got a bottle of lemonade or water, whatever, and took that with you.  And sandwiches, you know, and things like that.  And go off through the, what we used to call the meadows, they call them fields now, and go to different places.   Neddy’s well, there was a place called Neddy’s well.  At Neddy’s well there was a natural spring.  And the natural spring, my dad used to go there and you could get watercress.  And then he used to go across the bridge and down into the field, across from our house, and pick mushrooms.  But now from what I can gather its all built up with houses.  Well along that what they called the cinder path that’s the way I used to go to school.  Over the bridge, down the cinder path and up to the railway station.  Over the railway bridge and the school was there on the right hand side.  It was what was called a Church of England endowed school.  That meant that the church paid for the school where the church never paid for the Catholic school, the Catholic people had to look after their own.  And they used to go round their parishioners tocollect money off them to look after their church, the Catholics did.  I mean we used to collect money but we didn’t collect it like they did, you know go around the houses.  I used to deliver the church magazine at one time.  In one of the magazines, but I don’t think I have one, its got my name in.  It says about people who delivered the magazines and its got my name in.

birthday two

birthday

The Wonder of Nature

I’ve found a new secret place.  On a beautiful golden evening I took a walk down the dene and there it was.  Waiting for me.  In all its glory.  The golden light beckoning me to follow it into its heavenly domain.  And I took some pictures.  And I felt so happy to have found this magical place.  And I will visit it again.  Because nature is a wonderful thing.  It was here long before us. And it will be here long after us.  It is endearing. It is calming.  It is mighty.  It is the world we live in.  And we should cherish it.

Golden Hour 2

Golden Hour 3

Golden Hour

Nettle 2

Nettle 3

Nettle

secret pathway

White

“I’d run up the street when the mill was about to close and stand outside waiting for my mother. And people coming out and saying, “Hello there, your mam won’t be long”.  And then maybe one would come out another different night and, “oh, your mam’s going to be a long time cause she’s had a smash.”

“And what you call a smash was the shuttle had come out of the reeds and broken all the cotton.  And they used to have to bring all them through the reeds again and tie them.  And if it was too bad a smash they would change it and start again, if it was too bad.  But if it wasn’t too bad they’d mend it and then comb it.  But that part when the cloth was taken off the loom itself it was cut out. ”

  • Iris Anson

mum

Going back to my roots….

I took a break recently, well a long weekend. Back to my old haunt, the Lake District.  Just for a few days, recharge the batteries.  Back to the same place I’ve been going to since I was 13, that’s 39 years ago.  And a funny thing happened.  I promised my old mam that I would try and find out a little about her mums family, trace her roots back for her, as she did not know her maternal Grandmother and didn’t even know where the family came from.  I managed to get a copy of her mams birth certificate, something she hadn’t seen herself.  And taking the name of her mams mam (my mams grandmother, whom she’d never met) I traced the family back to Patterdale.  My great grandmother, Isabella Crosthwaite, and her siblings were born there. She lived there until she went into service and went to live in Kendal where she met my grandfather, William Nelson.  Isabella’s mother and father were called George and Sarah Crosthwaite.  Sarah was born in Patterdale too. How she met George I do not know but by 1856 they were married and living in the area.  He worked in the old lead mines that were dotted around Patterdale. By 1871 he was blind after an accident and they were living in a cottage named Elm How at the base of Hellvellyn.  I have no record of George’s death but Sarah died in 1879 and is buried in St Patrick’s church, Patterdale.

Why a funny thing then?  Well like I said I have been going to the same spot in the Lake District, Eastern end of Lake Ullswater, for 39 years.  Patterdale lies 10 miles away from Pooley Bridge, at the western end of Lake Ullswater.  So all the time I have been going ‘up the lakes’ little did I know that my ancestors had been born and were buried just down the road.

No wonder I have loved every minute I spend up there, and continue to do so.  Its in my genes.

Elm How Cottage

Elm How Cottage (at the base of Hellvellyn) Patterdale.  

My Old Mam

I work shifts, 12 hour shifts.  That’s three days a week.  Which means I have spare time during the week to do stuff I enjoy.  On most of my days off I go to visit my mam.  She lives with three dogs.  In a house we moved into in 1970, when I was 6.  She’ll never leave it, except when the inevitable happens.  She’s 88 so that time is creeping closer.  It scares me because then I will be parentless.  What will I do?  I’m not sure I will cope very well.  I dread it.  I can’t even bear to think about it.  What will I do with her house?  I grew up in it.  It holds so many memories.  My dog, Rebel, which I got when I was 13 (alot happens when you’re 13 I’ve decided) is buried there.  As are 3 other dogs, all of which I knew.  There’s also a piglet, Betsy, buried in the garden (that’s another story) and a hamster and I think some gold fish.  How do you let go of that?

My mam is from a certain generation.  She likes to speak her mind.  She’s also very loud (probably because she’s as deaf as a post)  It can be embarrassing, especially when out.  She’ll talk about people who are no more then a foot away, not polite comments either, and you just want a hole to swallow you up.  It used to annoy me but now, even though I cringe inside, I just let her get on with it.   Last time I spoke to her about it she stopped speaking to me for the rest of the day.  She’s from that generation, isn’t she, not afraid to speak their mind.  She’s stubborn too.  Even though I’m quite happy to help around the house so often refuses to let me do anything for her.  I get away with the gardening mind.  That she struggles with.  Its the getting up and down you see, not good for old bones.  Sometimes I tell her I’m off to the toilet and then I sneak off to do the washing up, or the hoovering, or dusting.  I get caught out of course because she wonders why I’m taking so long and she comes to find me.  Can never get away with anything me.

Mum four mum three Mum two Mum Cup of Tea